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How Crying Helps You Release Your Stress And Lose Weight More Effectively

How Crying Helps You Release Your Stress And Lose Weight More Effectively

Apart from helping you release those pent up emotions, it releases stress that prevents you from losing weight.

Have you always thought that crying, especially in public, is something to be ashamed of? Were you always convinced that it's a sign of weakness and wondered whether people saw you as 'fragile' if you teared up in front of them? Well, it's finally time to wipe all those misconceptions away because crying is actually good for you.

The next time you feel the pinch of tears in your eyes, don't hold them back! As you shed tears, it's almost like you're shedding those feelings of sadness, anger, and frustration along with them. Dr. Judith Orloff, a physician and author of books like The Empath’s Survival Guide and Emotional Freedom wrote, "It feels cleansing, a way to purge pent up emotions so they don’t lodge in my body as stress symptoms such as fatigue or pain."

Apart from giving you emotional relief, crying also helps release certain things your body doesn't really need.  Dr. Pete Sulack, an expert on relieving stress, told PopSugar that "in addition to being a good emotional and psychological release and a way to deal with intense emotion, crying is also good for reducing stress levels in the body."

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Crying can help in getting rid of substances as Dr. William H. Frey explained, according to The New York Times. "Crying is an exocrine process, that is, a process in which a substance comes out of the body," he explained. "Other exocrine processes, like exhaling, urinating, defecating and sweating, release toxic substances from the body. There's every reason to think crying does the same, releasing chemicals that the body produces in response to stress.''

This means that as the tears come out, you might also be releasing chemicals that induce stress, according to Dr. Frey's theory.

Dr. Sulack added, "getting rid of that adrenocorticotropic hormone actually reduces the body's cortisol levels."

When cortisol or stress hormones build up in your body, it can have effects on your body fat as well. A study published on the website of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) summarized that stress can play a significant role in obesity.

When you hold back tears, you are stopping your body's natural way of releasing stress. And when stress continues to build up, this affects your body's metabolism and even makes you crave for all those sugary things that make you put on weight. “Cortisol is involved in a broad range of biological processes, including metabolism, body composition and the accumulation of body fat,” said Sarah Jackson of University College London, according to Reuters. “When we’re stressed out we may also find it more difficult to find the motivation to go for a run or resist unhealthy foods.”

When your metabolism slows down, your body's ability to burn calories is also affected. As Harvard Health Publishing pointed out, with a higher metabolism you will be able to burn more calories when you are physically active and when you rest.

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When you cry your feelings out, you're releasing the stress inside you. And this stops your body from going into a chain reaction that can lead to weight gain. This doesn't necessarily mean that forcing yourself to cry rather than working out would guarantee that you will lose weight. When you feel emotional and that naturally makes you want to cry, the best thing for you to do is to just let it out. If you keep it inside, you might be suppressing your feelings and the stress can build up. And eventually, this gets in the way of weight loss. When you don't have to deal with stress, you will be able to reap more benefits from the physical activity and healthy diet that you incorporate into your routine.

References:

https://drjudithorloff.com/the-healing-power-of-tears/

https://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/31/science/biological-role-of-emotional-tears-emerges-through-recent-studies.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5958156/

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-stress-cortisol-obesity/more-evidence-linking-stress-to-obesity-idUSKBN17130P

https://www.health.harvard.edu/diet-and-weight-loss/does-metabolism-matter-in-weight-loss